We are crazy about good stories. Preferably with a bit of tension in it. They ensure that you keep your attention longer. Logically so that you like to use narrative elements in your blog or acquisition e-mails. But to come up with a good story every time is rather difficult, right? Not if you follow the tips in this article. Or listen to the original English-language podcast ! Avoid the ‘yawn moment’ – about clichés in your stories I remember how my father always started about the one time he drew a beautiful kingfisher while he was still at elementary school. I thought it was a wonderful story, but he told it so often that I only thought one thing: ‘Yawn, how do I get out of here?’. And that is exactly the feeling your reader gets when you walk a well-trodden path in your blog or sales e-mail. The entrepreneur who ‘follows his heart’, ‘the sky is the limit ..’ You know them. You’ve already read them somewhere. A piece or a hundred times. That is why these clichéd statements might be the first in you when you write an article yourself. But please, do not do it .. When do you decide to avoid a cliché? The same applies to comparisons. How often you do not read a story about someone comparing a football match with a situation in politics. Or an analogy about learning to cycle and do business. But sometimes you do not have to avoid such a cliché altogether. You can also adjust it. Make better. Let me give an example: In the book ‘ Brain Audit ‘ there is an analogy about waiting for your suitcase at the baggage claim at the airport. What is interesting about this? It is a situation that is recognizable to many people, but as an analogy is not used as often as ‘learning to cycle’ or ‘a football match’. That makes you read through. You can – must – make it even more interesting This is the moment when you add a personal element. Imagine that you are waiting for that suitcase. What is happening? What do you feel when you have just arrived in a foreign country, perhaps a strange continent, waiting for that suitcase? In ‘Brain Audit’ it is not just a suitcase, they are ‘seven red suitcases’. And while the story unfolds, one of those suitcases is missing. Are you wondering what happened to it? Beautiful. That is precisely the intention. Instead of a well-trodden path, a familiar cliché, you surprise the reader. You make him want to know more. The key to a better story: adding personal elements Try to imagine yourself at that airport. Where is it? How do you feel? How does it smell? What do you hear? What does it remind you of? Where is the disappointment, fear, hope, desire? Even if you use a more clichéd example – football game, learn to cycle – these elements can still help you to write a better story. Leestip: Corporate storytelling: how do you use storytelling for your company? A clichéd concept, originally told. Let me give an example. This is a story about learning to cycle ( the author did not grow up in the flat Netherlands -red ). Only an idiot would learn to ride like me. Most people find a safe flat environment when they learn to cycle. Not me. I took my bike to the steepest slopes with red mud. Every time I fell – and there were quite a few – I was covered in spots and abrasions. Learning to cycle on a slope also means that you are constantly fighting with gravity. But, long after all the abrasions had healed, after all the red mud had been washed out of my clothes, the experience always stayed with me. And I can cycle as the best. But what if you do not want to tell a story about yourself? Then you tell the story about your reader. What exactly do I mean by that? Let’s use the example above again: Why you should not learn to cycle in the park. Most people find a safe flat environment when they learn to cycle. But imagine that you do it differently. That you take your bike to the steepest slopes with red mud. Every time you fall – and there will be quite a few – you are covered in spots and abrasions. Learning to cycle on a slope also means that you are constantly fighting with gravity. But, long after all abrasions have healed, after all the red mud has been washed out of your clothes, the experience always stays with you. And you can cycle as the best. Do you see how the story is not too cliché, how it is not about yourself and how it still reads nicely? (like a train! – oh no, wait.) So this is exactly what you have to do when you find yourself using a cliché: What is the unusual element? – as with the seven red suitcases It is even better to make it a personal story Or if you prefer not to do that, write about the reader Do not limit yourself to blogs – also in newsletters, powerpoints, sales mails, landing pages etc. you can lose stories! There is always room for a good story. The best writers and marketers know this. They use it effectively in all forms with which you communicate with your customers. They throw in metaphors, anecdotes and analogies. Often also in spoken language. While the amateur writes simple clichéd boring texts. Stop those clichés. Be creative. Do not be an uncle at a birthday party. Combine personal anecdotes with surprising elements. And make sure that the ‘gaap moment’ disappears. Outsource your storytelling? CopyRobin helps. Place a free trial Let’s block ads! (Why?)

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